Aluminium Die Casting

La Cibek Die Casting

The evolution of Die Casting

  The evolution of Die Casting  
  Historic photo of La Cibek  

The Die-Casting process was invented in the United States derived from an idea of Herman Doehler co-founder of Doehler-Jarvis, who developed the first Die Casting machine. Yet in the United States the first Die Casting Aluminum component in the world was produced for commercial use in 1915.

In 1938 the Triulzi Company in Milan, designed and built the first horizontal Cold-Chamber machine for Aluminum alloy Die-Casting “copying the design” from an old “Polak”. This technology went far beyond the casting concept of that time, when the known technologies were Sand-Casting and Shell-Mould- casting only.

Over the years, many industries were founded all around Brescia, creating a unique Industrial District dedicated to the Die Casting sector based on injection systems technology.

The metals that are used in the Die-Casting process are mostly Aluminum and Zinc alloys. The pressure necessary for metal injction ranges from 20 to 1500 bars.

Thanks to the Die-Casting process you can achieve close tolerances and a better surface finishing than the obsolete Sand-Casting and Shell-Mould-casting processes.

The evolution of Die Casting The evolution of Die Casting

Die-Casting process can be divided into:

hot-chamber die casting and cold-chamber die casting.

Hot-chamber Die Casting

In the hot-chamber die casting the injection mechanism is immersed in the molten metal bath of a metal holding furnace. It allows better control of the casting temperature and higher productivity, as the molten metal is taken directly from the tank. The pressure needed for hot-chamber die casting is lower than the one needed for cold-chamber die casting and it does not usually exceed 130/140 bars.

Hot-chamber die casting is usually employed for zinc alloys (zamak) and allows with high-quality surface finish.

Cold-chamber Die Casting

In the cold-chamber die casting system, the control of the casting temperature and the productivity is lower than in the hot-chamber die casting system, as the injection of the molten metal in the mould takes longer. Cold-chamber die casting allows more flexibility in the choice of the casting alloy. The pressure needed for cold-chamber die casting is generally higher than the one needed for hot-chamber and it can reach up to 1500 bars.

Cold-chamber die casting is usually employed for Aluminium alloys. It is used for Zinc alloys, when high mechanical properties are required.